Shoe Cream – What Is It & Why Do You Need It?

What Does Shoe Cream Do?

You can view our entire shoe cream range by clicking HERE.

If you’re the sort of person who likes to purchase a pair of shoes or three, you should really know what a shoe cream is used for. There’s no point splashing out on those shoes or boots you’ve been admiring for the last month only to let them quickly become stained, dirty and scuffed. Protecting your shoes is a great start but a high quality shoe cream will keep them looking like new regardless of how often you decide to wear them.

Shoes have a tough life, it simply can’t be avoided. They’re a bit unfortunate in that we spend all day walking around on them, other people step on them and if we happen to drop a drink it’s very likely to end up covering them. With such harsh treatment, it’s understandable that they need a bit of care every so often.

A good shoe cream has multiple benefits. First and foremost it will add colour to your shoes to keep the colour looking deep and fresh. Nobody likes faded footwear and this is where a shoe cream comes into its own.

Our Famaco & Woly shoe creams will also condition the leather to keep it soft and supple. When leathers absorb moisture and then dry out they can begin to get brittle and start to crack and crease. A shoe cream will stop this and nourish the leather so that it can flex easily and ensure the shoes feel comfy on your feet.

Woly Shoe Cream

Woly Shoe Cream

 

How Do I Use A Shoe Cream?

Using a shoe cream is extremely simple. All you really need is the cream itself along with a suitable polishing cloth. Of course if you want to build yourself a top notch shoe care kit we highly recommend doing so by adding polishes, cloths, brushes and protectors but on this occasion none of that is necessary.

With a clean pair of shoes, take a small amount of cream onto a clean section of your cloth and apply the cream across the entire leather area of the shoe. For the best finish you’ll probably want to remove your laces. Underneath the laces often requires a lot of attention as this area is constantly pulled tight and then loosened once again.

So with your laces out and ready for washing or replacing, start to spread your cream thinly and evenly across the shoe being sure to fill any cracks and creases as well as getting into the welt between the outer sole and main part of the shoe.

Depending on how discoloured or marked your shoes are, you might want to add a few coats of shoe cream at this stage to build up the colour gradually and remove any evidence of tiredness and fading.

With your cream now applied, allow it to turn dull and dry gradually. This lets the cream set on the surface and the leather absorb it so that it isn’t just wiped straight off once again. Depending on how many layers you apply, the time this takes may vary but in most instances your cream will be dry in around 15-20 minutes.

 

Time To Polish

If you do have a horsehair shoe brush then great, you can gently and quickly brush the surface to reveal a beautiful shine. Chances are however, you probably haven’t. That isn’t a major issue as you can use your polishing cloth by itself to achieve excellent results too.

With a clean part of your polishing cloth, make small and fast circles which will begin to buff the polish to a shine. As the polish has dried, it won’t remove it and will leave a protective layer on the surface allowing water and other liquids to bead off.

 

Which Shoe Cream Do I Need?

All of our shoe creams offer the same benefits. Whether Woly or Famaco, we don’t compromise on quality with our products. Whereas other creams will simply add a bit of colour before wearing off once again, our creams offer a lasting finish and layer of protection.

Still need more information? Why not drop us a message and we’ll be happy to help or even match your shoes to one of our creams.

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2 comments to “Shoe Cream – What Is It & Why Do You Need It?”

  1. clare says:

    Hi – please can you let me know if Woly shoe creams are water based. Thank you very much.

    Kind regards

    Clare

  2. Richard Sneath says:

    Hi Clare,

    They aren’t. Woly creams are solvent based.

    Kind regards,
    Richard

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